What is a Pulse Oximeter?

Pulse oximeters measure light absorption in the finger to noninvasively monitor oxygen saturation and pulse rate. Fingertip pulse oximeters are being increasingly used for general wellness and health applications including sports, fitness, and relaxation management.

Challenges With Other Fingertip Pulse Oximeters

Multiple companies have introduced low-priced, battery-powered “fingertip” pulse oximeters to the consumer market. In some circumstances, these products may provide inaccurate measurements or no measurements at all. This often occurs when there is low blood flow to the finger (such as when the fingers are cold) or during hand movement (even with minimal motion such as shaking). In addition, many of the products on the market are of low quality and do not interface with smart phones to store, manage, and share data. Masimo is a publicly traded company (NASDAQ: MASI) based in Irvine, California. Masimo is the leading brand of hospital pulse oximeters1 because they provide accurate measurements when other pulse oximeters fail by using a revolutionary, patented invention called Signal Extraction Technology (SET®). Masimo SET® uses five parallel signal processing engines that measure through challenging conditions, including movement and low blood flow. With MightySat, the same high-performing Masimo SET® technology is now available for general wellness and health applications.

Masimo Personal Health Play

References

1 iData Research. U.S. Market for Patient Monitoring Equipment. 2014.


* It is suggested to measure PVi in the same body position, remaining still and without talking, at the same breathing rate and depth of breathing, until you see a high confidence PVi value (displayed value is bright, not dim). An increase in PVi may indicate a decreased level of hydration, increased breathing effort, or other factors. A decrease in PVi may indicate an increased level of hydration, decreased breathing effort, or other factors. Multiple factors other than hydration and breathing effort can affect PVi, including breathing rate, depth of breathing, body position, body movement, vascular tone, blood flow to the finger (perfusion index), normal variation within a short-term monitoring session, waveform shape changes, and/or cardiovascular abnormalities.


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